William Blake Quotes

Farewell green fields and happy groves, Where flocks have took delight.
William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. From SONGS OF INNOCENCE. Night (l. 9-10). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
Whate'er is Born of Mortal Birth Must be consumed with the Earth
William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. To Tirzah (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
The sun descending in the west, The evening star does shine; The birds are silent in their nest, And I must seek for mine.
William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. From SONGS OF INNOCENCE. Night (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poems [William Blake]. Alicia Ostriker, ed. (1977) Penguin Books.
Your friendship oft has made my heart to ache: Do be my enemy for friendship's sake.
William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. To William Hayley (l. 1-2). . . Treasury of Great Poems, English and American, A. Louis Untermeyer, ed. (Rev. and enl. Ed., 1955) Simon and Schuster.
All futurity Seems teeming with endless destruction never to be repelled; Desperate remorse swallows the present in a quenchless rage.
William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957). "Night the Eighth," The Four Zoas (1795-1804).
When a man has married a wife, he finds out whether Her knees and elbows are only glued together.
William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, mystic. When a Man Has Married a Wife (l. 1-2). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
Nature in darkness groans And men are bound to sullen contemplation in the night: Restless they turn on beds of sorrow; in their inmost brain Feeling the crushing wheels, they rise, they write the bitter words Of stern philosophy & knead the bread of knowledge with tears & groans.
William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. repr. In Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957). "Night the Ninth," The Four Zoas (1795-1804).
The Goddess Fortune is the devil's servant, ready to kiss any one's arse.
William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. repr. In Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957). Notes on illustrations to Dante, "The Goddess Fortune," (1825-1827).
Christ's crucifix shall be made an excuse for executing criminals.
William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. Notes on manuscript of "The Four Zoas," published in Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957).
Art can never exist without naked beauty displayed.
William Blake (1757-1827), British poet, painter, engraver. repr. In Complete Writings, ed. Geoffrey Keynes (1957). Notes on The Laocoön (engraved c. 1820).