William Butler Yeats Quotes

Minnaloushe creeps through the grass Alone, important and wise, And lifts to the changing moon His changing eyes.
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet. The Cat and the Moon (l. 25-28). . . The Collected Poems of W. B. Yeats. Richard J. Finneran, ed. (1989) Macmillan.
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Though you are in your shining days, Voices among the crowd And new friends busy with your praise, Be not unkind or proud, But think about old friends the most....
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet, playwright. "The Lover Pleads with His Friend for Old Friends."
(21) (4)
But boys and girls, pale from the imagined love Of solitary beds, knew what they were, That passion could bring character enough And pressed at midnighht in some public place Live lips upon a plummet-measured face.
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet. The Statues (l. 4-8). . . The Collected Poems of W. B. Yeats. Richard J. Finneran, ed. (1989) Macmillan.
(6) (2)
I bear a burden that might well try Men that do all by rule, And what can I That am a wandering-witted fool But pray to God that He ease My great responsibilities?
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet, playwright. "Two Songs of a Fool."
(6) (1)
Though I have many words, What woman's satisfied, I am no longer faint Because at her side? O who could have foretold That the heart grows old?
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet, playwright. "A Song."
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his head May not lie on the breast nor his lips on the hair Of the woman that he loves, until he dies. O beast of the wilderness, bird of the air, Must I endure your amorous cries?
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet, playwright. "He Thinks of his Past Greatness When a Part of the Constellations of Heaven."
(6) (1)
For everything that's lovely is But a brief, dreamy, kind delight.
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet, playwright. "Never Give All the Heart."
(14) (3)
What's left to sigh for, Strange night has come; God's love has hidden him Out of all harm, Pleasure has made him Weak as a worm.
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet, playwright. "The Chambermaid's First Song."
(4) (2)
O women, kneeling by your altar-rails long hence, When songs I wove for my beloved hide the prayer, And smoke from this dead heart drifts through the violet air And covers away the smoke of myrrh and frankincense; Bend down and pray for all that sin I wove in song....
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet, playwright. "The Lover Speaks to the Hearers of His Songs in Coming Days."
(4) (2)
We Irish, born into that ancient sect But thrown upon this filthy modern tide And by its formless spawning fury wrecked, Climb to our proper dark, that we may trace The lineaments of a plummet-measured face.
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet. The Statues (l. 28-32). . . The Collected Poems of W. B. Yeats. Richard J. Finneran, ed. (1989) Macmillan.
(7) (2)