William Butler Yeats Quotes

His eyelids droop, his head falls low, His old eyes cloud with dreams; The sun upon all things that grow Falls in sleepy streams.
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet, playwright. "The Ballad of the Foxhunter."
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Englishmen are babes in philosophy and so prefer faction-fighting to the labour of its unfamiliar thought.
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet, playwright. Letter, March 24, 1927. The Letters of W.B. Yeats, ed. Allan Wade (1954).
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I will find out where she has gone, And kiss her lips and take her hands; And walk among long dappled grass, And pluck till time and times are done The silver apples of the moon, The golden apples of the sun.
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet. The Song of Wandering Aengus (l. 19-24). . . The Collected Poems of W. B. Yeats. Richard J. Finneran, ed. (1989) Macmillan.
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"If little planned is little sinned But little need the grave distress. What's dying but a second wind? How but in zig-zag wantonness Could trumpeter Michael be so brave?"
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet, playwright. "Tom O'Roughley."
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"I am of Ireland, And the Holy Land of Ireland, And time runs on," cried she. "Come out of charity And dance with me in Ireland."
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet, playwright. "XX. 'I am of Ireland'...."
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It's certain that fine women eat A crazy salad with their meat Whereby the Horn of Plenty is undone.
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet. A Prayer for My Daughter (l. 30-32). . . The Collected Poems of W. B. Yeats. Richard J. Finneran, ed. (1989) Macmillan.
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Fasten your hair with a golden pin, And bind up every wandering tress; I bade my heart build these poor rhymes: It worked at them, day out, day in, Building a sorrowful loveliness Out of the battles of old times.
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet, playwright. "He Gives His Beloved Certain Rhymes."
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While man can still his body keep Wine or love drug him to sleep, Waking he thanks the Lord that he Has body and its stupidity....
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet, playwright. "Man and the Echo."
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"Put the chair upon the grass: Bring Rody and his hounds, That I may contented pass From these earthly bounds."
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet, playwright. "The Ballad of the Foxhunter."
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I agree about Shaw—he is haunted by the mystery he flouts. He is an atheist who trembles in the haunted corridor.
William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), Irish poet, playwright. Letter, July 1, 1921, to author George Russell. The Letters of W.B. Yeats, ed. Allan Wade (1954). Yeats expressed ambiguous views toward Shaw in his Autobiography (1938): "We all hated him with the left side of our heads, while admiring him immensely with the right side."
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