William Claude Dukenfield (January 29, 1880 – December 25, 1946), better known as W. C. Fields, was an American comedian, actor, juggler and writer. Fields was known for his comic persona as a misanthropic and hard-drinking egotist who remained a sympathetic character despite his snarling contempt for dogs, children and women.

The characterization he portrayed in films and on radio was so strong it became generally identified with Fields himself. It was maintained by the movie-studio publicity departments at Fields's studios (Paramount and Universal) and further established by Robert Lewis Taylor's 1949 biography W.C. Fields, His Follies and Fortunes. Beginning in 1973, with the publication of Fields's letters, photos, and personal notes in grandson Ronald Fields's book W.C. Fields by Himself, it has been shown that Fields was married (and subsequently estranged from his wife), and he financially supported their son and loved his grandchildren.

However, Madge Evans, a friend and actress, told a visitor in 1972 that Fields so deeply resented intrusions on his privacy by curious tourists walking up the driveway to his Los Angeles home that he would hide in the shrubs by his house and fire BB pellets at the trespassers' legs. Several years later Groucho Marx told a similar story on his live performance album, An Evening with Groucho.

more

William Claude Dukenfield Poems

William Claude Dukenfield Quotes

I was in love with a beautiful blonde once. She drove me to drink. That's the one thing I'm indebted to her for.
Otis Criblecoblis, U.S. screenwriter. W.C. Fields (W.C. Fields), Never Give a Sucker an Even Break, response to his niece Gloria Jean after she asks if he's ever been in love (1934).
I don't know why I ever come in here. The flies get the best of everything.
Otis Criblecoblis, U.S. screenwriter. W.C. Fields (W.C. Fields), Never Give a Sucker an Even Break, criticism of a diner after a surly waitress gives him a hard time (1934).
This scene was supposed to be in a saloon, but the censor cut it out. It'll play just as well.
Otis Criblecoblis, U.S. screenwriter. W.C. Fields (W.C. Fields), Never Give a Sucker an Even Break, an aside made to the camera in a nasty tweak at movie censorship (1934). The scene takes place in an ice cream parlor and Fields blows the head off his ice cream soda like beer foam.

Comments about William Claude Dukenfield

There is no comment submitted by members.