William Cowper Quotes

A fretful temper will divide The closest knot that may be tied, By ceaseless sharp corrosion; A temper passionate and fierce May suddenly your joys disperse At one immense explosion.
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. "Friendship," (written 1781, published 1800).
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His purposes will ripen fast, Unfolding ev'ry hour; The bud may have a bitter taste, But sweet will be the flow'r.
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. God moves in a mysterious way (l. 17-20). . . Seven Centuries of Poetry; Chaucer to Dylan Thomas. A. N. Jeffares, ed. (1955) Longmans, Green & Company.
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John Gilpin was a citizen Of credit and renown, A train-band captain eke was he Of famous London town.
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. John Gilpin (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Narrative Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1983) Oxford University Press.
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Now let us sing, Long live the king, And Gilpin long live he; And when he next doth ride abroad, May I be there to see!
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. John Gilpin (l. 249-252). . . Oxford Book of Narrative Verse, The. Iona Opie and Peter Opie, eds. (1983) Oxford University Press.
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Mr. Grenville squeezed me by the hand again, kissed the ladies, and withdrew. He kissed likewise the maid in the kitchen, and seemed upon the whole a most loving, kissing, kind-hearted gentleman.
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. Letter, March 29, 1874. Letters and Prose Writings of William Cowper, vol. 2, eds. J. King and C. Ryskamp (1981).
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Man disavows, and Deity disowns me: Hell might afford my miseries a shelter; Therefore hell keeps her ever-hungry mouths all Bolted against me.
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. Lines Written During a Period of Insanity (written 1763). The poem, one of Cowper's Sapphics, was written in 1763, a year in which Cowper made three suicide attempts, which were followed by a period of insanity and hospitalization.
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God moves in a mysterious way, His wonders to perform; He plants his footsteps in the sea, And rides upon the storm.
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. repr. In Poetical Works, ed. H.S. Milford (1934). Olney Hymns, no. 35, "Light Shining Out of Darkness," (1779).
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And Satan trembles when he sees The weakest saint upon his knees.
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. repr. In Poetical Works, ed. H.S. Milford (1934). Olney Hymns, no. 29, "Exhortation to Prayer," (1779).
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Here may we prove the pow'r of pray'r, To strengthen faith, and sweeten care; To teach our faint desires to rise, And bring all heav'n before our eyes.
William Cowper (1731-1800), British hymn-writer. Published in Olney Hymns, in Three Books, London, W. Oliver (1779). "On Opening a Place for Social Prayer," hymn #XLIV, book ii, pp. 234-35, l. 13-16 (1769).
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Toll for the brave— The brave! that are no more: All sunk beneath the wave, Fast by their native shore.
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. On the Loss of the Royal George (l. 1-4). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
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