William Cowper Quotes

I heard the bell tolled on thy burial day, I saw the hearse that bore thee slow away, And, turning from my nursery window, drew A long, long sigh, and wept a last adieu!
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. On the Receipt of My Mother's Picture out of Norfolk (l. 14-17). . . New Oxford Book of Eighteenth Century Verse, The. Roger Lonsdale, ed. (1984) Oxford University Press.
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O that those lips had language! Life has passed With me but roughly since I heard thee last.
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. On the Receipt of My Mother's Picture out of Norfolk (l. 1-2). . . New Oxford Book of Eighteenth Century Verse, The. Roger Lonsdale, ed. (1984) Oxford University Press.
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My Mother! when I learnt that thou wast dead, Say, wast thou conscious of the tears I shed? Hovered thy spirit o'er thy sorrowing son, Wretch even then, life's journey just begun?
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. On the Receipt of My Mother's Picture out of Norfolk (l. 7-10). . . New Oxford Book of Eighteenth Century Verse, The. Roger Lonsdale, ed. (1984) Oxford University Press.
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By contemplation's help,not sought in vain, I seem t' have liv'd my childhood o'er again; To have renew'd the joys that once were mine,
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. On the Receipt of My Mother's Picture out of Norfolk (l. 114-116). . . New Oxford Book of Eighteenth Century Verse, The. Roger Lonsdale, ed. (1984) Oxford University Press.
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I pity them greatly, but I must be mum, For how could we do without sugar and rum?
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. "Pity for Poor Africans," (written 1788, published 1800).
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Then Pope, as harmony itself exact, In verse well disciplined, complete, compact, Gave virtue and morality a grace, That, quite eclipsing pleasure's painted face, Levied a tax of wonder and applause, Even on the fools that trampled on their laws. But he (his musical finesse was such, So nice his ear, so delicate his touch) Made poetry a mere mechanic art; And every warbler has his tune by heart.
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. repr. In Poetical Works, ed. H.S. Milford (1934). Table Talk, l. 646-55 (1782).
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Obscurest night involv'd the sky, Th' Atlantic billows roar'd, When such a destin'd wretch as I, Wash'd headlong from on board, Of friends, of hope, of all bereft, His floating home for ever left.
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. The Castaway (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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But misery still delights to trace Its 'semblance in another's case. No voice divine the storm allay'd, No light propitious shone; When, snatch'd from all effectual aid, We perish'd, each alone: But I beneath a rougher sea, And whelm'd in deeper gulphs than he.
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. The Castaway (l. 59-66). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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Forced from home, and all its pleasures, Afric's coast I left forlorn; To increase a stranger's treasures, O'er the raging billows borne. Men from England bought and sold me, Paid my price in paltry gold; But, though theirs they have enroll'd me, Minds are never to be sold.
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. "The Negro's Complaint," (written 1788, published 1793).
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The poplars are felled, farewell to the shade And the whispering sound of the cool colonnade,
William Cowper (1731-1800), British poet. The Poplar Field (l. 1-2). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
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