William Hazlitt Quotes

The soul of a journey is liberty, perfect liberty, to think, feel, do just as one pleases.
William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Table Talk, "On Going a Journey," (1821-1822).
A hypocrite despises those whom he deceives, but has no respect for himself. He would make a dupe of himself too, if he could.
William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 398 (1823).
If we wish to know the force of human genius, we should read Shakespeare. If we wish to see the insignificance of human learning, we may study his commentators.
William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. First published in Edinburgh Magazine (July 1818). Table Talk, "On the Ignorance of the Learned," (1821-1822).
Reflection makes men cowards.
William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 228 (1823).
If we wish to know the force of human genius, we should read Shakespeare. If we wish to see the insignificance of human learning, we may study his commentators.
William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. First published in Edinburgh Magazine (July 1818). Table Talk, "On the Ignorance of the Learned," (1821-1822).
A grave blockhead should always go about with a lively one—they shew one another off to the best advantage.
William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 376 (1823).
If we wish to know the force of human genius, we should read Shakespeare. If we wish to see the insignificance of human learning, we may study his commentators.
William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. First published in Edinburgh Magazine (July 1818). Table Talk, "On the Ignorance of the Learned," (1821-1822).
The true barbarian is he who thinks everything barbarous but his own tastes and prejudices.
William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 333 (1823).
Modesty is the lowest of the virtues, and is a real confession of the deficiency it indicates. He who undervalues himself is justly undervalued by others.
William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. Table Talk, "On the Knowledge of Character," (1821-1822).
To a superior race of being the pretensions of mankind to extraordinary sanctity and virtue must seem ... ridiculous.
William Hazlitt (1778-1830), British essayist. repr. In The Complete Works Of William Hazlitt, vol. 9, ed. P.P. Howe (1932). Characteristics: In the Manner of Rochefoucault's Maxims, no. 191 (1823).