William Shakespeare Quotes

The younger rises when the old doth fall.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edmund, in King Lear, act 3, sc. 3, l. 25. Varying the proverb, "the rising of one man is the falling of another."
A pox of this gout! or a gout of this pox! for the one or the other plays the rogue with my great toe.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 1, sc. 2, l. 243-5. Diseases brought on by lechery ("pox" means syphilis) and drinking.
The earth, that's nature's mother, is her tomb. What is her burying grave, that is her womb.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Friar Lawrence, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 3, l. 9-10. "Earth is the mother of us all" was proverbial, but the Friar develops the paradox that everything nature brings to birth also dies.
He was a scholar, and a ripe and good one, Exceeding wise, fair-spoken and persuading.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Griffith, in Henry VIII, act 4, sc. 2, l. 51-2. Speaking of Wolsey's good qualities.
This goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 298-9.
I was with Hercules and Cadmus once, When in a wood of Crete they bayed the bear With hounds of Sparta: never did I hear Such gallant chiding; for besides the groves, The skies, the fountains, every region near Seemed all one mutual cry. I never heard So musical a discord, such sweet thunder.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hippolyta, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 4, sc. 1, l. 112-8. Theseus is here associated with classical legends in praise of hunting with a pack of hounds; "bayed" means brought to bay.
A fellow almost damned in a fair wife.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Iago, in Othello, act 1, sc. 1, l. 22. Describing Cassio.
This bud of love by summer's ripening breath May prove a beauteous flower when next we meet.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Juliet, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 121-2. Reassuring herself and Romeo that their love may flourish.
I know no ways to mince it in love, but directly to say, "I love you"; then if you urge me farther than to say, "Do you in faith?," I wear out my suit.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 5, sc. 2, l. 126-9. "Wear out my suit" means use up all my words of love; Henry presents himself as a plain man to Katherine.