William Shakespeare Quotes

Be bloody, bold, and resolute; laugh to scorn The power of man; for none of woman born Shall harm Macbeth.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 2nd Apparition, in Macbeth, act 4, sc. 1, l. 79-81.
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Dreams are toys. Yet for this once, yea, superstitiously, I will be squared by this.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antigonus, in The Winter's Tale, act 3, sc. 3, l. 39-41. Dreams are trifles ("toys"), yet Antigonus allows himself to be directed ("squared") in his course of action by his dream of Hermione.
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If you have tears, prepare to shed them now.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 2, l. 169. Displaying the body of Caesar to the people.
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It is my cousin's duty to make curtsy and say, "Father, as it please you." But yet for all that, cousin, let him be a handsome fellow, or else make another curtsy and say, "Father, as it please me."
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 1, l. 52-6.
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There we may rehearse most obscenely and courageously.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bottom, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 1, sc. 2, l. 107-8. "Obscenely" is Bottom's mistake for "seemly" (fitly).
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That high All-seer which I dallied with Hath turned my feigned prayer on my head, And given in earnest what I begged in jest.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Buckingham, in Richard III, act 4, sc. 5, l. 20-2. Buckingham had called on God to punish him if he was ever false to King Edward, and now goes to his death, executed by Richard.
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Cassius. Will you dine with me tomorrow? Casca. Ay, if I be alive, and your mind hold, and your dinner be worth the eating.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius and Casca, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 2, l. 290-2.
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What, courage, man! What though care killed a cat, thou hast mettle enough in thee to kill care.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudio, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 5, sc. 1, l. 132-4. To Benedick, who is unusually serious and full of care; "care will kill a cat" is proverbial.
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I wish you all joy of the worm.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Clown, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 5, sc. 2, l. 260. His parting words to Cleopatra as he leaves her the asps or snakes she uses to kill herself.
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Comparisons are odorous.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Dogberry, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 5, l. 16. Meaning "odious," and getting the proverb amusingly wrong.
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