William Shakespeare Quotes

Hell is murky.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lady Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 5, sc. 1, l. 36.
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Take physic, pomp, Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel, That thou mayst shake the superflux to them And show the heavens more just.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 3, sc. 4, l. 33-6. "Superflux" means superfluous possessions.
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This supernatural soliciting Cannot be ill, cannot be good.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Macbeth (I, iii). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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In my stars I am above thee, but be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon 'em.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Malvolio, in Twelfth Night, act 2, sc. 5, l. 139-41 (1623). Reading out Maria's letter, purportedly from the countess Olivia.
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No longer mourn for me when I am dead Than you shall hear the surly sullen bell Give warning to the world that I am fled From this vile world, with vilest worms to dwell: Nay, if you read this line, remember not The hand that writ it; for I love you so, That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot, If thinking on me then should make you woe.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. No longer mourn for me when I am dead (l. 1-8). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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Orsino. How dost thou like this tune? Viola. It gives a very echo to the seat Where love is throned.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Orsino and Viola, in Twelfth Night, act 2, sc. 4, l. 20-2. Music feeds Orsino's lovesickness.
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Simply the thing I am Shall make me live.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Parolles, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 4, sc. 3, l. 333-4. Bouncing back from humiliation.
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Your bait of falsehood takes this carp of truth, And thus do we of wisdom and of reach, With windlasses and with assays of bias, By indirections find directions out.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Polonius, in Hamlet, act 2, sc. 1, l. 60-3. Sending Reynaldo to spy on his son Laertes, and spread a few lies about him; "windlasses" means roundabout methods; "assays of bias" means indirect attempts, "bias" referring to the curving line in which a bowl runs.
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A trifle, some eight-penny matter.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Henry, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 3, l. 104. The ring Falstaff claims has been stolen from him.
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You speak all your part at once, cues and all.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Quince, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 3, sc. 1, l. 99-100. On Flute, who is rehearsing for the part of Thisbe in the play they are to stage for the wedding of Theseus and Hippolyta.
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