William Shakespeare Quotes

All her husbandry doth lie on heaps, Corrupting in its own fertility.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Burgundy, in Henry V, act 5, sc. 2, l. 39-40. "Husbandry" means cultivation; French farms are overgrown with noxious weeds because of war.
I am fresh of spirit and resolved To meet all perils very constantly.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 5, sc. 1, l. 90-1. Rejecting the bad omens seen before the battle of Philippi.
You seem to me as Dian in her orb, As chaste as is the bud ere it be blown; But you are more intemperate in your blood Than Venus, or those pampered animals That rage in savage sensuality.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudio, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, sc. 1, l. 57-61. Rejecting Hero as a bride: Diana, goddess of the moon and of chastity, is contrasted with Venus, goddess of love or sexuality; "blood" means sensual appetite.
Let me see, what am I to buy for our sheep-shearing feast? Three pound of sugar, five pound of currants, rice—what will this sister of mine do with rice? But my father hath made her mistress of the feast, and she lays it on.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Clown, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 3, l. 36-8. "Lays it on" means does it thoroughly; the midsummer sheep-shearing feast is celebrated countrywide with festivity.
A good old man, sir, he will be talking; as they say, "When the age is in, the wit is out."
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Dogberry, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 5, l. 33-4. On Verges, his assistant; proverbial phrases, though the second alters the proverb, "When the ale (or wine) is in, the wit is out."
Your fair discourse hath been as sugar, Making the hard way sweet and delectable.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Earl of Northumberland, in Richard II, act 2, sc. 3, l. 6-7. Flattering Henry Bolingbroke.
What doth gravity out of his bed at midnight?
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 4, l. 294. On an old nobleman arriving with a message for Hal.
We'll set thee to school to an ant, to teach thee there's no laboring i' the winter.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Fool, in King Lear, act 2, sc. 4, l. 67-8. Proverbs 6:6; Proverbs 30:25.
Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground, long heath, brown furze, anything.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gonzalo, in The Tempest, act 1, sc. 1, l. 65-7. Facing shipwreck.
Art thou there, truepenny? You hear this fellow in the cellarage, Consent to swear.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 5, l. 151-2. His father's honest ghost ("truepenny") speaks from under the stage ("the cellarage") urging Hamlet's friends to swear secrecy.