William Shakespeare Quotes

These high wild hills and rough uneven ways Draws out our miles and makes them wearisome.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Earl of Northumberland, in Richard II, act 2, sc. 3, l. 3-5. As a stranger in Gloucestershire.
If sack and sugar be a fault, God help the wicked! If to be old and merry be a sin, then many an old host that I know is damned.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 4, l. 470-2. Defending himself against Prince Henry's denunciation.
There was never yet fair woman but she made mouths in a glass.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Fool, in King Lear, act 3, sc. 2.
How lush and lusty the grass looks! How green!
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gonzalo, in The Tempest, act 2, sc. 1, l. 53-4.
The cat will mew, and dog will have his day.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 5, sc. 1, l. 292. One cannot stop a creature from acting according to its nature. Hamlet may refer to Laertes (as the cat), and himself (as the dog whose turn will come). The saying about the dog was proverbial.
Now I perceive that she hath made compare Between our statures; she hath urged her height, And with her personage, her tall personage, Her height, forsooth, she hath prevailed with him.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hermia, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 3, sc. 2, l. 290-3. Jealous of the taller Helena to whom her former lover, Lysander, has switched his affections.
She is of so free, so kind, so apt, so blessed a disposition, she holds it a vice in her goodness not to do more than she is requested.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Iago, in Othello, act 2, sc. 3, l. 319-22. Praising Desdemona.
All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players. They have their exits and their entrances, And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages. At first the infant, Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms. Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel And shining morning face, creeping like snail Unwillingly to school. And then the lover, Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then, a soldier, Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard, Jealous in honour, sudden, and quick in quarrel, Seeking the bubble reputation Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice, In fair round belly with good capon lined, With eyes severe and beard of formal cut, Full of wise saws and modern instances; And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts Into the lean and slippered pantaloon, With spectacles on nose and pouch on side, His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide For his shrunk shank, and his big, manly voice, Turning again toward childish treble, pipes And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all, That ends this strange, eventful history, Is second childishness and mere oblivion, Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jaques, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 7, l. 139-66 (1623).
Let there be no noise made, my gentle friends, Unless some dull and favorable hand Will whisper music to my weary spirit.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, sc. 5, l. 1-3. "Dull" means soothing, drowsy.
Though mine enemy thou hast ever been, High sparks of honor in thee have I seen.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Richard II, act 5, sc. 6, l. 28-9. Speaking to the Bishop of Carlisle, a supporter of the dead Richard II.