William Shakespeare Quotes

The heavens hold firm The walls of thy dear honor; keep unshaked That temple, thy fair mind, that thou mayst stand T' enjoy thy banished lord and this great land!
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 2nd Lord, in Cymbeline, act 2, sc. 1, l. 62-5. Speaking of Imogen and Posthumus, her husband.
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It is thyself, mine own self's better part: Mine eye's clear eye, my dear heart's dearer heart, My food, my fortune, and my sweet hope's aim, My sole earth's heaven, and my heaven's claim.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antipholus of Syracuse, in The Comedy of Errors, act 3, sc. 2, l. 61-4. To Luciana.
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He that loves to be flattered is worthy o' the flatterer.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Apemantus, in Timon of Athens, act 1, sc. 1, l. 226-7.
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He wears his faith but as the fashion of his hat; it ever changes with the next block.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 1, sc. 1, l. 75-7. Mocking Benedick as one who changes loyalty to friends (and perhaps religious faith) as often as he changes the fashion of his hat; "block" means mould.
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The finch, the sparrow, and the lark, The plainsong cuckoo grey, Whose note full many a man doth mark And dares not answer nay.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bottom, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 3, sc. 1, l. 130-3. The cuckoo invades the nests of other birds, and is associated with cuckoldry; Bottom sings because he is afraid.
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Speak on, but be not over-tedious.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Burgundy, in Henry VI, Part 1, act 3, sc. 3, l. 43.
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Have you not love enough to bear with me, When that rash humor which my mother gave me Makes me forgetful?
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 119-21. To Brutus; "rash humor" means hasty temper.
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O, what authority and show of truth Can cunning sin cover itself withal!
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudio, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, sc. 1, l. 35-6. To Leonatus, who, he thinks, is deceiving him; "authority" means assurance.
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He'll shake Your Rome about your ears.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cominius, in Coriolanus, act 4, sc. 6, l. 98-9. Said of Coriolanus, when news comes that he has joined with the Volscians against Rome.
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O that he were here to write me down an ass! But, masters, remember that I am an ass; though it be not written down, yet forget not that I am an ass.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Dogberry, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, sc. 2, l. 75-8. Keen to have his own stupidity recorded for posterity.
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