William Shakespeare Quotes

Here's the smell of the blood still: all the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lady Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 5, sc. 1, l. 50-1. Imagining in her sleep-walking that she can smell Duncan's blood on her hands.
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O heavens! If you do love old men, if your sweet sway Allow obedience, if you yourselves are old, Make it your cause; send down, and take my part.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 2, sc. 4, l. 189-92. "Allow" means approve; Lear is thinking of the disobedience and ingratitude of his daughters.
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'Tis the eye of childhood That fears a painted devil.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Macbeth (II, ii). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon 'em.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Malvolio, in Twelfth Night, act 2, sc. 4, l. 145-6. Reading Maria's letter that feeds his self-importance.
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Why, what a wasp-stung and impatient fool Are thou to break into this woman's mood, Tying thine ear to no tongue but thine own!
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Northumberland, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 1, sc. 3, l. 236-8. To Hotspur, who keeps talking, too enraged to listen to anyone.
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There is no woman's sides Can bide the beating of so strong a passion As love doth give my heart; no woman's heart So big, to hold so much; they lack retention. Alas, their love may be called appetite.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Orsino, in Twelfth Night, act 2, sc. 4, l. 93-7. Speaking to Cesario, really Viola in disguise; "bide" means endure.
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A woman impudent and mannish grown Is not more loathed than an effeminate man In time of action.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Patroclus, in Troilus and Cressida, act 3, sc. 3, l. 216-9. Speaking of his own reluctance to fight; Thersites calls Patroclus Achilles' "masculine whore."
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Drink, sir, is a great provoker of three things ... nose-painting, sleep, and urine. Lechery, sir, it provokes and unprovokes: it provokes the desire but it takes away the performance. Therefore much drink may be said to be an equivocator with lechery: it makes him and it mars him; it sets him on and it takes him off.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Porter, in Macbeth, act 2, sc. 3, l. 25-7 (1623). "Nose-painting" refers to the drunkard's red nose.
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This new and gorgeous garment, majesty, Sits not so easy on me as you think.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Henry, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 5, sc. 2, l. 44-5. On taking the throne as Henry V...
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O sir, to wilful men The injuries that they themselves procure Must be their schoolmasters.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Regan, in King Lear, act 2, sc. 4, l. 302-4.
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