William Shakespeare Quotes

Wear this for me: one out of suits with Fortune, That could give more, but that her hand lacks means.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 1, sc. 2, l. 246-7. Giving Orlando a chain; she is out of Fortune's favor because her father has been driven into exile.
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Fast bind, fast find, A proverb never stale in thrifty mind.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Shylock, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 5, l. 54-5. Meaning keep things secure and they are readily found.
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Report of fashions in proud Italy, Whose manners still our tardy-apish nation Limps after in base imitation.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. The Duke of York, in Richard II, act 2, sc. 1.
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Now I stand as one upon a rock, Environed with a wilderness of sea, Who marks the waxing tide grow wave by wave, Expecting ever when some envious surge Will in his brinish bowels swallow him.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Titus, in Titus Andronicus, act 3, sc. 1, l. 93-7. "His" = its.
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When he was naked he was, for all the world, like a forked radish, with a head fantastically carved upon it with a knife.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Warwick, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 3, sc. 2, l. 308. Falstaff describing Shallow as a young man.
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I am one, my liege, Whom the vile blows and buffets of the world Hath so incensed that I am reckless what I do to spite the world.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 2nd Murderer, in Macbeth, act 3, sc. 1, l. 107-10.
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I to the world am like a drop of water, That in the ocean seeks another drop, Who, falling there to find his fellow forth (Unseen, inquisitive), confounds himself. So I, to find a mother and a brother, In quest of them (unhappy), lose myself.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. "To the world" means in relation to the world; "confounds himself" means mingles and loses its identity. Antipholus of Syracuse, in The Comedy of Errors, act 1, sc. 2, l. 34-40.
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Here's that which is too weak to be a sinner, Honest water, which ne'er left man i' th' mire.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Apemantus, in Timon of Athens, act 1, sc. 2, l. 58-9. As opposed to the wine that flows in Timon's house.
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O that I were a man for his sake, or that I had any friend that would be a man for my sake! But manhood is melted into curtsies, valor into compliment.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, sc. 1, l. 317-8. Wishing she could challenge Claudio to a duel.
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O grim-looked night, O night with hue so black, O night which ever art when day is not!
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bottom, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 5, sc. 1, l. 170-1. As Pyramus, addressing the night.
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