William Shakespeare Quotes

Like to a pair of loving turtle-doves That could not live asunder day or night.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Burgundy, in Henry VI, Part 1, act 2, sc. 2, l. 30-1. Referring to the Dauphin and Joan of Arc.
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Now could I, Casca, name to thee a man Most like this dreadful night, That thunders, lightens, opens graves, and roars As doth the lion in the Capitol— A man no mightier than thyself or me In personal action, yet prodigious grown And fearful, as these strange eruptions are.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 3, l. 72-8. Referring to Julius Caesar; the audience may have thought of the lions kept in the Tower of London.
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Friendship is constant in all other things Save in the office and affairs of love.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudio, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 1, l. 175-6. Thinking he has been betrayed by his friend Don Pedro; "office" means business.
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It is held That valor is the chiefest virtue, and Most dignifies the haver.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cominius, in Coriolanus, act 2, sc. 2, l. 83-5. Praising Coriolanus for his courage in battle ("haver" means possessor).
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An two men ride of a horse, one must ride behind.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Dogberry, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 5, l. 36-7. Thinking of himself as at the front, of course.
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The worst is not So long as we can say, "This is the worst."
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edgar, in King Lear, act 4, sc. 1, l. 27-8.
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I would 'twere bed-time, Hal, and all well.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 5, sc. 1, l. 125. Showing his fear of dying in battle.
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Thou shouldst not have been old till thou hadst been wise.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Fool, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 5, l. 44-5. Addressing King Lear.
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Beseech you, sir, be merry; you have cause, So have we all, of joy.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gonzalo, in The Tempest, act 2, sc. 1, l. 1-2. Appealing to Alonso to be joyful after coming safely ashore.
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The dread of something after death, The undiscovered country from whose bourn No traveller returns.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 1, l. 80-82 (1604). part of Hamlet's meditative soliloquy on the question of "To be, or not to be."
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