William Shakespeare Quotes

The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lady Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 5, l. 38-40. The croaking of the raven proverbially foreshadowed misfortune or death.
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You think I'll weep: No, I'll not weep. I have full cause of weeping, but this heart Shall break into a hundred thousand flaws Or ere I'll weep.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 2, sc. 4, l. 282-6. "Flaws" means fragments; "Or ere" means before.
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Macbeth. Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased, Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, Raze out the written troubles of the brain, And with some sweet oblivious antidote Cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff Which weighs upon the heart? Doctor. Therein the patient Must minister to himself.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth and Doctor, in Macbeth, act 5, sc. 3, l. 40-6. "Raze out" means erase; "oblivious" means producing forgetfulness; the "stuff" that weighs on the heart includes guilt for murder.
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Mamillius. What color are your eyebrows? 1st Lady. Blue, my lord. Mamillius. Nay, that's a mock. I have seen a lady's nose That has been blue, but not her eyebrows.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Mamillius and 1st Lady, in The Winter's Tale, act 2, sc. 1, l. 13-5. Hermione's little son talks with court ladies.
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Get posts and letters, and make friends with speed; Never so few, and never yet more need.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Northumberland, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 1, sc. 1, l. 215. "Posts" were messengers who rode by stages where they changed horses.
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O spirit of love, how quick and fresh art thou.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Orsino, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 1, l. 9. "Quick and fresh" means alert and vigorous.
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He hopes it is no other But for your health and your digestion sake, An after-dinner's breath.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Patroclus, in Troilus and Cressida, act 2, sc. 3, l. 110-12. The Greek leaders, calling on Achilles, meet with this rebuff.
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It provokes the desire but it takes away the performance. Therefore much drink may be said to be an equivocator with lechery: it makes him and it mars him; it sets him on and it takes him off.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Porter, in Macbeth, act 2, sc. 3.
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This sleep is sound indeed, this is a sleep That from this golden rigol hath divorced So many English kings.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Henry, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, sc. 5, l. 35-7. "Rigol" means circle (compare "regal").
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O sir, you are old; Nature in you stands on the very verge Of his confine.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Regan, in King Lear, act 2, sc. 4, l. 146-8. "Confine" means limit, bounds.
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