William Shakespeare Quotes

I myself am best When least in company.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Orsino, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 4, l. 37-8. The lovesick Orsino prefers to be alone.
Slander, Whose sting is sharper than the sword's.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Paulina, in The Winter's Tale, act 2, sc. 3, l. 86-7. Convinced that Hermione is wrongly accused and slandered.
Portia. Why, know'st thou any harm's intended towards him? Soothsayer. None that I know will be, much that I fear may chance.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia and the Soothsayer, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 4, l. 31-2. The soothsayer fears for Caesar.
Thy due from me Is tears and heavy sorrows of the blood, Which nature, love, and filial tenderness Shall, O dear father, pay thee plenteously.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Henry, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, sc. 5, l. 37-40. Thinking his father is dead.
Richard. Harp not on that string, madam, that is past. Queen Elizabeth. Harp on it still shall I till heart-strings break.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Richard, and Queen Elizabeth in Richard III, act 4, sc. 4, l. 364-5. He wants to talk of marriage, but she reminds him of the murders he has perpetrated.
I must comfort the weaker vessel, as doublet and hose ought to show itself courageous to petticoat.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 4, l. 5-7. in disguise as a boy; "the weaker vessel" is woman, a biblical phrase (Paul's first epistle to Peter, 3.7).
Thou call'st me dog before thou hadst a cause, But since I am a dog, beware my fangs.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Shylock, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 3, l. 6-7. Threatening Antonio.
A man in all the world's new fashion planted, That hath a mint of phrases in his brain. One who the music of his own vain tongue Doth ravish like enchanting harmony.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. The King, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 1, sc. 1, l. 164-7. Commenting on Armado and his extravagant language.
When will this fearful slumber have an end?
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Titus, in Titus Andronicus, act 3, sc. 1, l. 252. Thinking all the horrors that have happened may be a dream.
There is a history in all men's lives, Figuring the natures of the times deceased, The which observed, a man may prophesy, With a near aim, of the main chance of things As yet not come to life.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Warwick, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 3, sc. 1, l. 80-4. A chain of events ("history") in everyone's past life may indicate pretty well ("with a near aim") the likely shape of things to come.