William Shakespeare Quotes

'Tis an ill cook that cannot lick his own fingers.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 2nd Servingman, in Romeo and Juliet, act 4, sc. 2, l. 6-7.
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They say this town is full of cozenage: As nimble jugglers that deceive the eye, Dark-working sorcerers that change the mind, Soul-killing witches that deform the body, Disguised cheaters, prating mountebanks, And many such-like liberties of sin.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antipholus of Syracuse, in The Comedy of Errors, act 1, sc. 2, l. 97-102. The reputation of Ephesus, where Antipholus has just arrived; mountebanks were quack doctors or charlatans.
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I wonder men dare trust themselves with men.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Apemantus, in Timon of Athens, act 1, sc. 2, l. 43. Seeing that Timon's guests are destroying him.
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Manhood is melted into courtesies, valour into compliment, and men are only turned into tongue, and trim ones, too.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, sc. 1.
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As young as I am, I have observed these three swashers. I am boy to them all three, but all they three, though they would serve me, could not be man to me.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Boy, in Henry V, act 3, sc. 2, l. 28-31. Seeing through the swashbuckling Nym, Bardolph and Pistol, who, for all their bravado, are cowards; "boy" means servant.
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Bravest at the last, She levelled at our purposes, and being royal Took her own way.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caesar, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 5, sc. 2, l. 335-7. Finding Cleopatra dead by her own hand.
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O insupportable and touching loss!
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 151. On the news of the death of Portia, Brutus's wife.
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Give not this rotten orange to your friend; She's but the sign and semblance of her honor.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudio, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, sc. 1, l. 32-3. Rejecting Hero as unchaste at the wedding ceremony; "sign and semblance" means outward appearance.
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I see that the fashion wears out more apparel than the man.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Conrade, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 3, l. 139-40. Changes in fashion often cause people to discard clothing before it is worn out.
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I am a wise fellow, and, which is more, an officer; and, which is more, a householder; and, which is more, as pretty a piece of flesh as any is in Messina; and one that knows the law, go to; and a rich fellow enough, go to; and a fellow that hath had losses; and one that hath two gowns and everything handsome about him.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Dogberry, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, sc. 2, l. 80-6. Priding himself on his modest wealth and status.
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