William Shakespeare Quotes

On the Alps It is reported thou didst eat strange flesh, Which some did die to look on.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caesar, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 1, sc. 4, l. 66-8. Hardships endured by Antony as a soldier.
I had as lief not be as live to be In awe of such a thing as I myself.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 2, l. 95-6. "As lief not be" means as soon not exist; he is thinking of Caesar.
She knows the heat of a luxurious bed. Her blush is guiltiness, not modesty.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudio, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, sc. 1, l. 41-2. Accusing Hero of being unchaste; "luxurious" could mean lecherous.
A very little little let us do And all is done.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Constable, in Henry V, act 4, sc. 2, l. 33-4. Convinced the French will have an easy victory.
Truly, I would not hang a dog by my will, much more a man who hath any honesty in him.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Dogberry, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 3, l. 63-4.
Bear free and patient thoughts.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edgar, in King Lear, act 4, sc. 6, l. 80. Advising his father; "free" means free from guilt or anxiety.
There's no more faith in thee than in a stewed prune.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 3, l. 12-3. Insulting the Hostess, who denies he has been robbed in her tavern; stewed prunes were associated with brothels, where regular food could not be served.
Let four captains Bear Hamlet like a soldier to the stage, For he was likely, had he been put on, To have proved most royally.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Fortinbras, in Hamlet, act 5, sc. 2, l. 395-8. Hamlet receives a soldier's funeral.
Poor Desdemona! I am glad thy father's dead. Thy match was mortal to him, and pure grief Shore his old thread in twain.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gratiano, in Othello, act 5, sc. 2, l. 205-6. Cutting the thread of life alludes to the Fates who in ancient mythology spun the thread (Clotho) and cut it at death (Atropos); the phrase became proverbial; "shore" means sheared.
Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio: a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy.... Where be your jibes now, your gambols, your songs, your flashes of merriment that were wont to set the table on a roar?
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 5, sc. 1. The grave-digger has turned up the skull of Yorick, the king's jester; on stage Hamlet usually holds the skull while he says this; "fancy" means imagination.