William Shakespeare Quotes

If music be the food of love, play on, Give me excess of it that, surfeiting, The appetite may sicken and so die.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Orsino, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 1, l. 1-3 (1623). Opening lines of play. The words are recalled in Shakespeare's later work, Antony and Cleopatra, when Cleopatra calls out for music, "moody food/Of us that trade in love." Act 2, sc. 5, l. 1.
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I like your silence, it the more shows off Your wonder.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Paulina, in The Winter's Tale, act 5, sc. 3, l. 21-2. Leontes is struck dumb on seeing, as he thinks, so lifelike a statue of Hermione.
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Ay me, how weak a thing The heart of woman is!
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 4, l. 39-40.
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For never was a story of more woe Than this of Juliet and her Romeo.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince, in Romeo and Juliet, act 5, sc. 3, l. 309-10. The Prince of Verona pronouncing an epitaph on the dead lovers.
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Of comfort no man speak. Let's talk of graves, of worms and epitaphs, Make dust our paper, and with rainy eyes Write sorrow on the bosom of the earth. Let's choose executors and talk of wills.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Richard, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 2, l. 140-4 (1597).
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Men are April when they woo, December when they wed; maids are May when they are maids, but the sky changes when they are wives.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 1, l. 147-9. A woman's view of marriage.
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You take my house when you do take the prop That doth sustain my house; you take my life When you do take the means whereby I live.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Shylock, in The Merchant of Venice, act 4, sc. 1, l. 375-7. To the Duke, whose judgment is to pardon Shylock his life, but seize all his wealth.
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How well he's read, to reason against reading!
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. The King, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 1, sc. 1, l. 94.
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To me, fair friend, you never can be old, For as you were when first your eye I ey'd, Such seems your beauty still. Three winters cold Have from the forests shook three summer's pride, Three beauteous springs to yellow autumns turn'd In process of the seasons have I seen, Three April perfumes in three hot Junes burn'd, Since first I saw you fresh, which yet are green. Ah, yet doth beauty, like a dial hand, Steal from his figure, and no pace perceiv'd! So your sweet hue, which methinks still doth stand, Hath motion, and mine eye may be deceiv'd; For fear of which, hear this, thou age unbred: Ere you were born was beauty's summer dead.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. To me, fair friend, you never can be old (l. 1-14). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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Was it the proud full sail of his great verse, Bound for the prize of all too precious you, That did my ripe thoughts in my brain inherse, Making their tomb the womb wherein they grew? Was it his spirit, by spirits taught to write Above a mortal pitch, that struck me dead?
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Was it the proud full sail of his great verse (l. 1-6). OBSC. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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