William Shakespeare Quotes

Away before me to sweet beds of flowers. Love-thoughts lie rich when canopied with bowers.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Orsino, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 1, l. 39-40. Lovesick for Olivia, who has no interest in him.
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What's gone and what's past help Should be past grief.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Paulina, in The Winter's Tale, act 3, sc. 2, l. 222-3. An elegant variation on the proverb, "never grieve for that you cannot help."
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Dwell I but in the suburbs Of your good pleasure? If it be no more, Portia is Brutus' harlot, not his wife.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 1, l. 285-7. The brothels in Elizabethan London were located in the suburbs, beyond the jurisdiction of the city.
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Fortune now To my heart's hope!
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince of Arragon, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 9, l. 19-20. Hoping for good luck in choosing the right casket.
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For God doth know, and you may partly see, How far I am from the desire of this.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Richard, in Richard III, act 3, sc. 7, l. 235-6. Pretending he does not want power and the throne.
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Very good orators when they are out, they will spit.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 1, l. 75-6. "Out" means lost for words.
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Ships are but boards, sailors but men; there be land-rats and water-rats, water-thieves and land-thieves, I mean pirates, and then there is the peril of waters, winds, and rocks.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Shylock, in The Merchant of Venice, act 1, sc. 3, l. 22-5. On Antonio's business ventures, his goods sent off on various ships; the heavy-handed joke on "pi-rats" marks Shylock's odd sense of humor.
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It is engend'red in the eyes, With gazing fed; and fancy dies In the cradle where it lies. Let us all ring fancy's knell. I'll begin it—Ding, dong, bell.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. The Merchant of Venice (III, ii). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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Sweetest nut hath sourest rind.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Touchstone, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 2, l. 155-7. Mocking Rosalind as sweet and sour.
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Weary with toil, I haste me to my bed, The dear repose for limbs with travel tired; But then begins a journey in my head To work my mind, when body's work's expired:
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Weary with toil, I haste me to my bed (l. 1-4). OBSC. The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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