William Shakespeare Quotes

Men must learn now with pity to dispense, For policy sits above conscience.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 1st Stranger, in Timon of Athens, act 3, sc. 2, l. 86-7. Commenting on the refusal of Timon's friends to help him.
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I have heard, but not believed, the spirits o'the dead May walk again.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antigonus, in The Winter's Tale, act 3, sc. 3, l. 16-17. After dreaming that he saw Hermione, whom he believes to be dead.
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Over thy wounds now do I prophesy ... A curse shall light upon the limbs of men, Domestic fury and fierce civil strife Shall cumber all the parts of Italy.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 1, l. 259, 262-4. The wounds are those of the assassinated Julius Caesar.
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I have a good eye, uncle; I can see a church by daylight.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 1, l. 82-3. On her clearsighted view of marriage.
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Truly, a peck of provender, I could munch your good dry oats. Methinks I have a great desire to a bottle of hay. Good hay, sweet hay hath no fellow.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bottom, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 4, sc. 1, l. 31-4. Bottom when transformed into an ass; a "bottle" is a truss.
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Be not easily won to our requests; Play the maid's part: still answer nay, and take it.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Buckingham, in Richard III, act 3, sc. 7, l. 51. Advising Richard on how to behave when he is offered the crown; it was proverbial that maids said no when they meant yes.
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Cassius. I did not think you could have been so angry. Brutus. O Cassius, I am sick of many griefs.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius and Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 143-4.
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Death is a fearful thing.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudio, in Measure for Measure, act 3, sc. 1, l. 115. He is in prison, and sentenced to death.
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A whoreson jackanapes must take me up for swearing; as if I borrowed mine oaths of him and might not spend them at my pleasure.... When a gentleman is disposed to swear, it is not for any standers-by to curtail his oaths, ha?
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cloten, in Cymbeline, act 2, sc. 1.
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Dogberry. Are you good men and true? Verges. Yea, or else it were pity but they should suffer salvation, body and soul.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Dogberry and Verges, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 3, l. 1-3. Possibly the earliest comic policemen addressing the watchmen; Verges means to say "damnation."
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