William Shakespeare Quotes

The Prince of Darkness is a gentleman.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edgar, in the disguise of Poor Tom, in King Lear, act 3, sc. 4.
A good sherris-sack hath a twofold operation in it. It ascends me into the brain,... makes it apprehensive, quick, forgetive, full of nimble, fiery, and delectable shapes.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, sc. 3, l. 96-7, 99-100. Praising the effects of drinking sherry ("sherris-sack," from "Xeres" in Spain and "seco" means dry), that stimulates the imagination to be creative ("forgetive," from the verb to forge).
The grey-eyed morn smiles on the frowning night, Checkering the eastern clouds with streaks of light.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Friar Lawrence, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 3, l. 1-4.
What, this gentleman will out-talk us all.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gremio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 1, sc. 2, l. 246. On hearing Tranio, disguised as Lucentio, offering to woo Bianca.
I have of late—but wherefore I know not—lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercise.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 295-7. To Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, on his melancholy.
So turns she every man the wrong side out, And never gives to truth and virtue that Which simpleness and merit purchaseth.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hero, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 1, l. 68-70. Making sure that Beatrice hears this criticism of her as too judgmental, and as denying integrity ("simpleness") and merit what they deserve ("purchaseth").
The Moor is of a free and open nature, That thinks men honest that but seem to be so, And will as tenderly be led by the nose As asses are.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Iago, in Othello, act 1, sc. 3, l. 399-400. Speaking of Othello as artless ("free and open") and easily ("tenderly") deceived.
More are men's ends marked than their lives before. The setting sun, and music at the close, As the last taste of sweets, is sweetest last, Writ in remembrance more than things long past.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. John of Gaunt, in Richard II, act 2, sc. 1, l. 11-4. Spoken as he anticipates his death; "marked" means noticed.
Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry IV pt. 2, act 3, sc. 1, l. 31 (1600). The phrase may originally have derived from Erasmus' Institutio Principis (1516), though it had become proverbial by Shakespeare's time.
Make less thy body hence, and more thy grace. Leave gormandizing; know the grave doth gape For thee thrice wider than for other men.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry V, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 5, sc. 5, l. 52-4. Advising Falstaff to slim henceforth, abandon gluttony ("gormandizing"), and attend to his soul, to divine influence ("grace").