William Shakespeare Quotes

He uses his folly like a stalking-horse, and under the presentation of that he shoots his wit.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Duke Senior of Touchstone, in As You Like It, act 5, sc. 4.
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I never see thy face but I think upon hell-fire.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 3, l. 31. To Bardolph, whose nose is red.
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Here's a night pities neither wise men nor fools.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Fool, in King Lear, act 3, sc. 2, l. 12-3.
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As you are old and reverend, you should be wise.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Goneril, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 4, l. 240.
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Be thou a spirit of health, or goblin damned, Bring with thee airs from heaven, or blasts from hell, Be thy intents wicked or charitable, Thou com'st in such a questionable shape That I will speak to thee.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 4, l. 40-4. Addressing the ghost as a spirit that appears in his father's shape; "questionable" means which invites questions.
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O weary night, O long and tedious night, Abate thy hours, shine comforts from the east.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Helena, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 3, sc. 2, l. 431-2. "Abate" means cut short, abridge.
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Though I do hate him as I do hell pains, Yet, for necessity of present life, I must show out a flag and sign of love, Which is indeed but sign.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Iago, in Othello, act 1, sc. 1, l. 154-7. Telling Roderigo his true attitude to Othello.
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It is a melancholy of mine own, compounded of many simples, extracted from many objects.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jaques, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 1, l. 15-7. "Simples" means ingredients.
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Why, Harry, do I tell thee of my foes, Which art my nearest and dearest enemy?
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 2, l. 122-3. To Prince Hal, reproaching him for failing to support his father.
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Our kinsman Gloucester is as innocent From meaning treason to our royal person As is the sucking lamb or harmless dove.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry VI, Part 2, act 3, sc. 1, l. 69-71. The comparisons are proverbial.
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