William Shakespeare Quotes

Then must you speak Of one the lov'd not wisely but too well; Of one not easily jealous, but, being wrought, Perplex'd in the extreme; of one whose hand, Like the base Indian, threw a pearl away Richer than all his tribe;
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Othello (V, ii). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
Daffodils, That come before the swallow dares, and take The winds of March with beauty.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Perdita, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 4, l. 118-20. Perdita wishes for flowers to express her love for Florizel.
There is not one among them but I dote on his very absence.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia, in The Merchant of Venice, act 1, sc. 2, l. 109-10. Dismayed by all her suitors, she wishes they would go away.
"Who chooseth me shall get as much as he deserves."
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince of Morocco, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 7, l. 23. Reading the message on the silver casket.
O coward conscience, how dost thou afflict me!
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Richard, in Richard III, act 5, sc. 3, l. 179. Starting out of a nightmare.
If it be true that good wine needs no bush, 'tis true that a good play needs no epilogue.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, epilogue, l. 3-5. It was proverbial that a good wine needed no bush, or sign, hung out to advertise sale of it.
I am a great eater of beef, and I believe that does harm to my wit.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Sir Andrew Aguecheek, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 3, l. 85-6. Eating beef was proverbially linked to being stupid or "beef-witted."
'O opportunity! thy guilt is great, 'Tis thou that execut'st the traitor's treason; Thou set'st the wolf where he the lamb may get; Whoever plots the sin, thou point'st the season; 'Tis thou that spurn'st at right, at law, at reason; And in thy shady cell, where none may spy him, Sits Sin to seize the souls that wander by him.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. The Rape of Lucrece (l. 1-8). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
To get your living by the copulation of cattle.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Touchstone, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 2, l. 79-80. Mocking Corin, the shepherd, about country life.
When I do count the clock that tells the time, And see the brave day sunk in hideous night, When I behold the violet past prime, And sable curls all silvered o'er with white: When lofty trees I see barren of leaves, Which erst from heat did canopy the herd And summer's green all girded up in sheaves Borne on the bier with white and bristly beard: Then of thy beauty do I question make That thou among the wastes of time must go, Since sweets and beauties do themselves forsake, And die as fast as they see others grow, And nothing 'gainst Time's scythe can make defence Save breed to brave him, when he takes thee hence.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. When I do count the clock that tells the time (l. 1-14). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.