William Shakespeare Quotes

This is the excellent foppery of the world: that when we are sick in fortune—often the surfeits of our own behaviour—we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and stars, as if we were villains on necessity, fools by heavenly compulsion, knaves, thieves, and treachers by spherical predominance, drunkards, liars, and adulterers by an enforced obedience of planetary influence.... An admirable evasion of whoremaster man, to lay his goatish disposition on the charge of a star!
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edmond, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 2, l. 116-26 (1623).
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All you that kiss my Lady Peace at home.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 1, sc. 2, l. 207-8. To the Chief Justice, as Falstaff goes off to fight rebels.
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Care keeps his watch in every old man's eye, And where care lodges, sleep will never lie; But where unbruisèd youth with unstuffed brain Doth couch his limbs, there golden sleep doth reign.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Friar Lawrence, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 3, l. 35-8. The old Friar is interrupted early in the morning by Romeo.
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O this learning, what a thing it is!
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gremio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 1, sc. 2, l. 159. The foolish Gremio admires learning.
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I have heard That guilty creatures sitting at a play Have by the very cunning of the scene Been struck so to the soul, that presently They have proclaimed their malefactions.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 588-92. Thinking of ways to expose Claudius's guilt; "malefactions" means crimes, evil-doing.
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The moon, like to a silver bow New bent in heaven, shall behold the night Of our solemnities.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hippolyta, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 1, sc. 1, l. 9-11. To Theseus, whom she is to marry.
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And what's he then that says I play the villain, When this advice is free I give, and honest, Probal to thinking, and indeed the course To win the Moor again?
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Iago, in Othello, act 2, sc. 3, l. 336-9. Addressing the audience after advising Cassio to apply to Desdemona; "probal" means reasonable.
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Now is the sun upon the highmost hill Of this day's journey.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Juliet, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 5, l. 9-10. It is noon, and she has been waiting three hours for her nurse to return.
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An angel is like you, Kate, and you are like an angel.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 5, sc. 2, l. 109-10. Wooing Katherine of France.
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I know thee not, old man. Fall to thy prayers. How ill white hairs becomes a fool and jester!
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry V, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 5, sc. 5, l. 47-8. His famous rejection of his old companion, Falstaff.
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