William Wordsworth Quotes

They flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with the daffodils.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud (l. 21-24). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
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For by superior energies; more strict Affiance in each other; faith more firm In their unhallowed principles, the bad Have fairly earned a victory o'er the weak, The vacillating, inconsistent good.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Excursion, bk. 4, l. 305-9 (1814).
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I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils;
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud (l. 1-4). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
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Lost in a gloom of uninspired research.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Excursion, bk. 4.
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I am already kindly disposed towards you. My friendship it is not in my power to give: this is a gift which no man can make, it is not in our own power: a sound and healthy friendship is the growth of time and circumstance, it will spring up and thrive like a wildflower when these favour, and when they do not, it is in vain to look for it.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Letter, July 29, 1803, to author Thomas De Quincey. De Quincey had written Wordsworth a letter expressing his admiration. The two had never met.
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For the discerning intellect of Man, When wedded to this goodly universe In love and holy passion, shall find these A simple produce of the common day. MI, long before the blissful hour arrives, Would chant, in lonely peace, the spousal verse Of this great consummation—
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Excursion: The Recluse (l. 52-58). . . The Poems; Vol. 2 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1989) Penguin Books.
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That best portion of a good man's life; His little, nameless, unremembered acts Of kindness and of love.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, l. 34-6, Lyrical Ballads (1798).
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On Man, on Nature, and on Human Life, Musing is solitude,
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Excursion: The Recluse (l. 1-2). . . The Poems; Vol. 2 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1989) Penguin Books.
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Neither evil tongues, Rash judgements, nor the sneers of selfish men, Nor greetings where no kindness is, nor all The dreary intercourse of daily life, Shall e'er prevail against us.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, l. 129-33, Lyrical Ballads (1798).
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the Mind of Man— My haunt, and the main region of my song.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Excursion: The Recluse (l. 40-41). . . The Poems; Vol. 2 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1989) Penguin Books.
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