William Wordsworth Quotes

So didst thou travel on life's common way, In cheerful godliness; and yet thy heart The lowliest duties on herself did lay.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. London, 1802 (l. 12-14). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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And open field, through which the pathway wound, And homeward led my steps. Magnificent The morning rose, in memorable pomp, Glorious as e'er I had beheld—in front, The sea lay laughing at a distance; near, The solid mountains shone, bright as the clouds, Grain-tinctured, drenched in empyrean light;
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Prelude; IV. Summer Vacation (l. 322-328). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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And give us manners, virtue, freedom, power. Thy soul was like a star, and dwelt apart.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. London, 1802 (l. 8-9). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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I made no vows, but vows Were then made for me; bond unknown to me Was given, that I should be, else sinning greatly, A dedicated Spirit.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Prelude; IV. Summer Vacation (l. 334-337). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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Milton! thou should'st be living at this hour: England hath need of thee:
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. London, 1802 (l. 1-2). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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Knowledge and increase of enduring joy From the great Nature that exists in works Of mighty Poets.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Prelude; V. Books (l. 593-595). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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No mate, no comrade Lucy knew; She dwelt on a wide moor, MThe sweetest thing that ever grew Beside a human door!
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lucy Gray; or, Solitude (l. 5-8). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
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With all its solemn imagery, its rocks, Its woods, and that uncertain heaven, received Into the bosom of the steady lake.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Prelude; V. Books (l. 463-465). . . English Romantic Poetry and Prose. Russell Noyes, ed. (1956) Oxford University Press.
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All good poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquillity.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lyrical Ballads, preface, 2nd edition (1801). This sentiment, which is a central tenet in Wordsworth's criticism, has parallels in Schiller, Ueber Bürgers Gedichte, as well as Coleridge's Notebooks, in which he speaks of "recalling passion in tranquillity."
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In verity, an independent world, Created out of pure intelligence.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Prelude; VI. Cambridge and the Alps. . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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