William Wordsworth Quotes

Whither is fled the visionary gleam? Where is it now, the glory and the dream?
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood (l. 56-57). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
Thrice welcome, darling of the Spring!
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. To the Cuckoo (l. 13). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
To me the meanest flower that blows can give Thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood (l. 201-202). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
O Cuckoo! shall I call thee Bird, Or but a wandering Voice?
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. To the Cuckoo (l. 2-4). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
O joy! that in our embers Is something that doth live,
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood (l. 129-130). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
And thou wert still a hope, a love; Still longed for, never seen.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. To the Cuckoo (l. 23-24). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
Hence in a season of calm weather Though inland far we be, Our Souls have sight of that immortal sea Which brought us hither,
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood (l. 161-164). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
Thou unassuming common-place Of Nature, with that homely face.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. To the Same Flower [Daisy]....
The thought of our past years in me doth breed Perpetual benediction: not indeed For that which is most worthy to be blest— Delight and liberty, the simple creed Of Childhood, whether busy or at rest, With new-fledged hope still fluttering in his breast:—
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood (l. 133-138), Poems in Two Volumes (1807). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
Thou hast left behind Powers that will work for thee; air, earth, and skies; There's not a breathing of the common wind That will forget thee; thou hast great allies; Thy friends are exultations, agonies, And love, and man's unconquerable mind.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. To Toussaint L'Ouverture (l. 8-14). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.