William Wordsworth Quotes

The innocent brightness of a new-born Day Is lovely yet; The Clouds that gather round the setting sun Do take a sober colouring from an eye That hath kept watch o'er man's mortality;
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood (l. 194-197). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
The homely beauty of the good old cause Is gone;
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Written in London, September 1802 (l. 12-13). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
In the faith that looks through death, In years that bring the philosophic mind.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood (l. 185-186). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
The wealthiest man among us is the best:
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Written in London, September 1802 (l. 7). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
Stern Daughter of the Voice of God! O Duty! if that name thou love, Who art a light to guide, a rod To check the erring, and reprove;
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Ode to Duty (l. 1-4), Poems in Two Volumes (1807). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
The cattle are grazing, Their heads never raising; There are forty feeding like one!
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Written in March (l. 8-10). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
No motion has she now, no force; She neither hears nor sees; Rolled round in earth's diurnal course, With rocks, and stones, and trees.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. A Slumber Did My Spirit Seal, st. 2 (1800). This verse has been the subject of a literary dispute centering on Wordsworth's pantheism: is the death of the girl (Lucy) terrible because she is as inanimate as the earth's inert objects, or consoling because she is one with nature?
Flowers laugh before thee upon their beds And fragrance in thy footing treads; Thou dost preserve the stars from wrong; And the most ancient heavens, through thee, are fresh and strong.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Ode to Duty (l. 45-48). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
Like an army defeated The snow hath retreated,
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Written in March (l. 11-12). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
And therefore does not stoop, nor lie in wait For wealth, or honors, or for worldly state;
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Character of the Happy Warrior (l. 41-42). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.