William Wycherley Quotes

A mistress should be like a little country retreat near the town, not to dwell in constantly, but only for a night and away.
William Wycherley (1640-1716), British dramatist. repr. In Plays of William Wycherley, ed. W.C. Ward (1888). Dorilant, in The Country Wife, act 1 (1675).
Mistresses are like books; if you pore upon them too much, they doze you and make you unfit for company; but if used discreetly, you are the fitter for conversation by 'em.
William Wycherley (1640-1716), British dramatist. Harcourt, in The Country Wife, act 1.
Women serve but to keep a man from better company.
William Wycherley (1640-1716), British dramatist. Horner, in The Country Wife, act 1.
Women of quality are so civil, you can hardly distinguish love from good breeding.
William Wycherley (1640-1716), British dramatist. repr. In Plays of William Wycherley, ed. W.C. Ward (1888). Horner, in The Country Wife, act 1 (1675).
Your women of honour, as you call 'em, are only chary of their reputations, not their persons; and 'tis scandal that they would avoid, not men.
William Wycherley (1640-1716), British dramatist. Horner, in The Country Wife, act 1.
Good fellowship and friendship are lasting, rational and manly pleasures.
William Wycherley (1640-1716), British dramatist. Horner, in The Country Wife, act 1.
I have heard people eat most heartily of another man's meat, that is, what they do not pay for.
William Wycherley (1640-1716), British dramatist. Lady Fidget, in The Country Wife, act 5.
Marrying to increase love is like gaming to become rich; alas, you only lose what little stock you had before.
William Wycherley (1640-1716), British dramatist. Lucy, in The Country Wife, act 4.
He's a fool that marries, but he's a greater that does not marry a fool; what is wit in a wife good for, but to make a man a cuckold?
William Wycherley (1640-1716), British dramatist. Pinchwife, in The Country Wife, act 1.