Wilson Mizner (May 19, 1876 – April 3, 1933) was an American playwright, raconteur, and entrepreneur. His best-known plays are The Deep Purple, produced in 1910, and The Greyhound, produced in 1912. He was manager and co-owner of The Brown Derby restaurant in Los Angeles, California, and was affiliated with his brother, Addison Mizner, in a series of scams and picaresque misadventures that inspired Stephen Sondheim's musical Road Show.

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Wilson Mizner Poems

Wilson Mizner Quotes

Working for Warner Brothers is like fucking a porcupine: it's a hundred pricks against one.
Wilson Mizner (1876-1933), U.S. dramatist, wit. Quoted in Bring on the Empty Horses, "Degrees of Friendlness," David Niven (1975).
If you steal from one author, it's plagiarism; if you steal from many, it's research.
Wilson Mizner (1876-1933), U.S. dramatist, wit. Quoted in The Legendary Mizners, ch. 4, Alva Johnson (1953).
A trip through a sewer in a glass-bottomed boat.
Wilson Mizner (1876-1933), U.S. dramatist, wit. Quoted in The Legendary Mizners, ch. 4, Alva Johnson (1953). Mizner's description of Hollywood was reworked by Mayor James J. Walker: "A reformer is a guy who rides through a sewer in a glass-bottomed boat." (Speech as mayor of New York, 1928).

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