Woodrow Wilson Quotes

Some of the greatest and most lasting effects of genuine oratory have gone forth from secluded lecture desks into the hearts of quiet groups of students.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. An Old Master and Other Essays, p. 4, Charles Scribner's Sons (1893).
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He was no specialist except in the relation of things.... He took most of his materials at second hand.... But no matter who mined the gold, the image and superscription are his.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. An Old Master and Other Essays, p. 454, Charles Scribner's Sons (1896). Wilson was writing about Adam Smith. He undoubtedly had himself in mind as well.
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Scholarship cannot do without literature.... It needs literature to float it, to set it current, to authenticate it to all the race, to get it out of closets and into the brains of men who stir abroad.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. An Old Master and Other Political Essays, p. 53, Charles Scribner's Sons (1893).
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The United States must be neutral in fact as well as in name.... We must be impartial in thought as well as in action ... a nation that neither sits in judgment upon others nor is disturbed in her own counsels and which keeps herself fit and free to do what is honest and disinterested and truly serviceable for the peace of the world.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. A statement to the country (August 19, 1914). Wilson was declaring neutrality at the beginning of World War I....
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I want to re-echo my hope that we may all work together for a great peace as distinguished from a mean peace.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. At the Palazzo in Milan, Italy (January 5, 1919).
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Where the great force lies, there must be the sanction of peace.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. At the Peace Conference, May 31, 1919. Despite Wilson's advocacy of self-determination and the right of all nations, he knew realistically that the great powers must be responsible for keeping the peace.
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It is like writing history with lightning and my only regret is that it is all so terribly true.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. Democrat, president. Attributed in The Image, ch. 4, Daniel J. Boorstin (1962). on seeing D.W. Griffith's monumental epic of the Civil War, The Birth of a Nation, at the White House, Feb. 18, 1915.
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Doctor, the devil is a busy man.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. In the White House, March 19, 1921. August Heckscher, Woodrow Wilson, p. 631. Wilson, at 3 a.m. having summoned his physician to his side, following the final defeat in the Senate of the League of Nations and the Treaty of Versailles.
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Senator Albert B. Fall: "We have been praying for you, Sir." President Wilson: "Which way, Senator?"
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. In the White House, December 6, 1919. August Heckscher, Woodrow Wilson, pp. 621-622. Wilson, critically disabled by a stroke, was being visited by an arch-enemy in the Senate, to test his fitness to remain as President. After this exchange the doubts ended.
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Mrs. Susan Hart Neville: "Oh, Mr. President, it is so good of you to call on me. Won't you please walk into the parlor and sit down?" President Wilson: "I haven't time to sit down. Your house is on fire."
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Cary T. Grayson, Woodrow Wilson: an Intimate Memoir, pp. 31-32. Wilson was vacationing in Pass Christian, Mississippi, when, passing in his automobile, he saw flames emerging from a roof. He later wrote Mrs. Neville, "I shall never cease to be gratified that our machine passed so opportunely."
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