Woodrow Wilson Quotes

The westward march has stopped, upon the final plains of the Pacific; and now the plot thickens ... with the change, the pause, the settlement, our people draw into closer groups, stand face to face, to know each other and be known.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Mere Literature and Other Essays, p. 246, Houghton Mifflin (1896).
(0) (0)
It is the object of learning, not only to satisfy the curiosity and perfect the spirits of ordinary men, but also to advance civilization.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Mere Literature and Other Essays, pp. 73-74, Houghton Mifflin (1896).
(1) (0)
The ordinary literary man, even though he be an eminent historian, is ill-fitted to be a mentor in affairs of government. For ... things are for the most part very simple in books, and in practical life very complex.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Mere Literature and Other Essays, pp. 73-74, Houghton Mifflin (1896).
(0) (0)
It has become a people's war, and peoples of all sorts and races, of every degree of power and variety of fortune, are involved in its sweeping processes of change and settlement.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Note to the Hungarian government (December 17, 1918).
(1) (0)
Once lead this people into war and they will forget there ever was such a thing as tolerance.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. Democrat, president. quoted in Mr. Wilson's War, pt. 3, ch. 12, John Dos Passos (1917). See Wilson's comment on "World War I...."
(1) (0)
He would have been wise, perhaps, without her, but he would not have been wise so delightfully.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. "A Literary Politician." Ray Stannard Baker, Woodrow Wilson: Life and Letters, vol. 1, p. 139.
(0) (0)
That is Gladstone, the greatest statesman that ever lived. I intend to be a statesman, too.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Jessie Bones Brower to Ray Stannard Baker. Ray Stannard Baker, Woodrow Wilson: Life and Letters, vol. 1, p. 57. Wilson was sixteen years old, sitting under a portrait of Gladstone, when this remark was made.
(0) (0)
Great statesmen seem to direct and rule by a sort of power to put themselves in the place of the nation over which they are set, and may thus be said to possess the souls of poets at the same time they display the coarser sense and the more vulgar sagacity of practical men of business.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. The Nassau Literary Magazine (October 1878). Ray Stannard Baker, Woodrow Wilson: Life and Letters, vol. 1, p. 196. Wilson wrote this as a senior at Princeton. This was evidently before the age of the pollsters.
(0) (0)
The method of political science ... is the interpretation of life; its instrument is insight, a nice understanding of subtle, unformulated conditions.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Letter, February 17, 1891, to Horace E. Scudder. Ray Stannard Baker, Woodrow Wilson: Life and Letters, vol. 2, p. 107.
(0) (0)
A man may be defeated by his own secondary successes.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Ray Stannard Baker, Woodrow Wilson: Life and Letters, vol. 1, p. 247.
(1) (0)