Woodrow Wilson Quotes

We have not given science too big a place in our education, but we have made a perilous mistake in giving it too great a preponderance in method in every other branch of study.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Inaugural address, October 25, 1902, as president of Princeton University. The Papers of Woodrow Wilson, vol. 14, p. 170, ed. Arthur S. Link.
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One cool judgment is worth a thousand hasty counsels. The thing to do is to supply light and not heat.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. Democratic politician, president. Speech, January 29, 1916, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
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Science ... has won for us a great liberty in the physical world, a liberty from superstitious fear and from disease, a freedom to use nature as a familiar servant; but it has not freed us from ourselves.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Inaugural address, October 25, 1902, as president of Princeton University. The Papers of Woodrow Wilson, vol. 14, p. 170, ed. Arthur S. Link.
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You cannot become thorough Americans if you think of yourselves in groups. America does not consist of groups. A man who thinks of himself as belonging to a particular national group in America has not yet become an American.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. Democratic politician, president. Speech, May 10, 1915, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
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There will be no greater burden on our generation than to organize the forces of liberty in our time in order to make our quest of a new freedom for America.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Campaign address, October 3, 1912, in Indianapolis. The Public Papers of Woodrow Wilson, vol. 25, p. 327, ed. Arthur S. Link. In this extemporaneous address at a country fair, Wilson used for the first time the words "new freedom," which became the slogan for his whole program of reform.
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That a peasant may become king does not render the kingdom democratic.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. speech, Aug. 31, 1910, Chattanooga, Tenn.
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The competent leader of men cares little for the niceties of other peoples' characters: he cares much—everything—for the exterior uses to which they may be put.... These are men to be moved. How should he move them? He supplies the power; others simply the materials on which that power operates.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Address, June 17, 1890, "Leaders of Men." The Public Papers of Woodrow Wilson, vol. 8, p. 650, ed. Arthur S. Link. As a young professor of political science, Wilson hinted at the hardness which he would later show as a public figure.
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A radical is one of whom people say "He goes too far." A conservative, on the other hand, is one who "doesn't go far enough." Then there is the reactionary, "one who doesn't go at all." All these terms are more or less objectionable, wherefore we have coined the term "progressive." I should say that a progressive is one who insists upon recognizing new facts as they present themselves—one who adjusts legislation to these new facts.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. Democratic politician, president. Speech, January 29, 1911, Kansas Society of New York, New York City.
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This little world, this little state, this little commonwealth of our own....
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Baccalaureate address, June 12, 1904, Princeton University. The Public Papers of Woodrow Wilson, vol. 15, p. 366, ed. Arthur S. Link. Wilson was speaking of the undergraduate life at Princeton, where he received his first training in statesmanship.
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Interest does not tie nations together; it sometimes separates them. But sympathy and understanding does unite them.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. Democratic politician, president. speech, Oct. 27, 1913.
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