Woodrow Wilson Quotes

Never for a moment have I had one doubt about my religious beliefs. There are people who believe only so far as they can understand—that seems to me presumptuous and sets their understanding as the standard of the universe.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Quotation, January 3, 1919, from the Diary of Nancy S. Toy. The Public Papers of Woodrow Wilson, vol. 32, p. 9, ed. Arthur S. Link.
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The city of Washington is in some respects self-contained, and it is easy there to forget what the rest of the United States is thinking about. I count it a fortunate circumstance that almost all the windows of the White House and its offices open upon unoccupied spaces that stretch to the banks of the Potomac ... and that as I sit there I can constantly forget Washington and remember the United States.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Address at Philadelphia (October 25, 1913).
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I have had the accomplishment of something like this at heart ever since I was a boy.... So I feel tonight like the man who is lodging happily in the inn which lies half way along the journey and that in time, with a fresh impulse, we shall go the rest of the journey and sleep at the journey's end like men with a quiet conscience.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Remarks, October 3, 1913, on signing the tariff bill. The Public Papers of Woodrow Wilson, vol. 28, p. 351, ed. Arthur S. Link. Tariff reform was followed by currency reform, Wilson's other half of that particular journey.
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The spirit of [William] Penn will not be stayed. You cannot set limits to such knightly adventurers. After their own day is gone their spirits stalk the world, carrying inspiration everywhere that they go and reminding men of the lineage, the fine lineage, of those who have sought justice and right.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Address at Swathmore College (October 25, 1913).
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So far as the colleges go, the sideshows are swallowing up the circus.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. address, June 3, 1909, at St. Paul's School, Concord, N.H... The Public Papers of Woodrow Wilson, vol. 19, p. 326. Ed. Arthur S. Link.
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We are expected to put the utmost energy, of every power that we have, into the service of our fellow men, never sparing ourselves, not condescending to think of what is going to happen to ourselves, but ready, if need be, to go to the utter length of self-sacrifice.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Address at the Brooklyn Navy Yard (May 11, 1914). Wilson was commemorating those who had fallen at Vera Cruz. In a way he was predicting his ultimate self-sacrifice.
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I am so glad that I am young, so that I may give my youth to you.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Letter, May 22, 1885, to Ellen Axson. The Public Papers of Woodrow Wilson, vol. 4, p. 617, ed. Arthur S. Link.
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There is a very holy and a very terrible isolation for the conscience of every man who seeks to read the destiny in affairs for others as well as for himself, for a nation as well as for individuals. That privacy no man can intrude upon. That lonely search of the spirit for the right perhaps no man can assist.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Address at the dedication of the Lincoln Memorial, Springfield, Illinois (September 14, 1916). Wilson was speaking of Lincoln, but no doubt reflecting on his own experience.
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Liberty has never come from the government. Liberty has always come from the subjects of the government. The history of government is a history of resistance. The history of liberty is the history of the limitation of government, not the increase of it.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Address, September 9, 1912, to the New York Press Club. The Public Papers of Woodrow Wilson, vol. 25, p. 124, ed. Arthur S. Link. In the 1912 campaign Wilson was violently attacked by his opponent Theodore Roosevelt for this statement, which was held to be a betrayal of the Progressive cause.
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It was a very lonely spirit that looked out from under those shaggy brows and comprehended men without fully communicating with them, as if, in spite of all its genial efforts at comradeship, it dwelt apart, saw its visions of duty where no man looked on.... This strange child of the cabin kept company with invisible things, was born into no intimacy but that its own silently assembling and deploying thoughts.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Address at the dedication of the Lincoln Memorial, Springfield, Illinois (September 4, 1916). Wilson was speaking of Abraham Lincoln whom he greatly admired and with whom he was sometimes compared.
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