Woodrow Wilson Quotes

It is the object of learning, not only to satisfy the curiosity and perfect the spirits of ordinary men, but also to advance civilization.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Mere Literature and Other Essays, pp. 73-74, Houghton Mifflin (1896).
It has become a people's war, and peoples of all sorts and races, of every degree of power and variety of fortune, are involved in its sweeping processes of change and settlement.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Note to the Hungarian government (December 17, 1918).
Once lead this people into war and they will forget there ever was such a thing as tolerance.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. Democrat, president. quoted in Mr. Wilson's War, pt. 3, ch. 12, John Dos Passos (1917). See Wilson's comment on "World War I...."
He would have been wise, perhaps, without her, but he would not have been wise so delightfully.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. "A Literary Politician." Ray Stannard Baker, Woodrow Wilson: Life and Letters, vol. 1, p. 139.
The method of political science ... is the interpretation of life; its instrument is insight, a nice understanding of subtle, unformulated conditions.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Letter, February 17, 1891, to Horace E. Scudder. Ray Stannard Baker, Woodrow Wilson: Life and Letters, vol. 2, p. 107.
A man may be defeated by his own secondary successes.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Ray Stannard Baker, Woodrow Wilson: Life and Letters, vol. 1, p. 247.
Such a mind we must desire to see in a woman,—a mind that stirs without irritating you, that arouses but does not belabour, amuses and yet subtly instructs.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. "A Literary Politician." Ray Stannard Baker, Woodrow Wilson: Life and Letters, vol. 1, p. 159.
My father did enough of it in his lifetime to answer for both of us.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Ray Stannard Baker, Woodrow Wilson: Life and Letters, Wilson's answer to a query as to why he did not smoke.
We have beaten the living, but we cannot fight the dead.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Stockton Axson to R.S. Baker, quoting Wilson. Ray Stannard Baker, Woodrow Wilson: Life and Letters, vol. 2, p. 346. Wilson's reaction to a final defeat at Princeton, brought about by an unexpected bequest putting millions of dollars under the control of his enemies.
As compared with the college politician, the real article seems like an amateur.
Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), U.S. president. Interview, August 26, 1911, of Wilson by Needham, "The Outlook." Ray Stannard Baker, Woodrow Wilson: Life and Letters, vol. 2, p. 266.